Spring College Enrollments Continue to Decline

Undergraduate Enrollments Down 300,000 for Spring 2017; Graduate and Professional Enrollments Up 27,000

by | May 24, 2017 | Research Reports, Research Services, Signature Reports |

Discover States with Largest Decreases and Increases in Enrollment and Majors

Spring postsecondary overall enrollments fell by more than 272,000 students compared to a year ago, led by a decline of more than 244,000 students over the age of 24 and many were enrolled in a four-year, for-profit institution or a two-year public college, according to the Spring 2017 Current Term Enrollment Estimates report from the National Student Clearinghouse® Research Center™, the nation’s most trusted source for student record data.

Enrollments declined in 39 states and increased in 12 states and the District of Columbia. A total of 18,071,004 student enrollments occurred in all institutions this spring, but 1.8 percent of those were the same students attending more than one institution at the same time. Unduplicated, the Research Center counted 17,740,912 unique students.

Published every May and December, Current Term Enrollment Estimates are based on postsecondary institutions actively submitting data to the Clearinghouse. These institutions account for nearly 97 percent of the nation’s Title IV, degree-granting enrollments.

Can you guess the top states with largest decreases and increases in enrollment, and majors with the largest decreases and increases?

Read our press release for all the details.

Percent Change from Previous Year, Enrollment by Sector

“The spring 2017 numbers reinforce the trends that we saw in the fall term, and will likely continue: enrollments at community colleges and smaller non-profits declining, while four-year public colleges and larger privates hold steady.”

Doug Shapiro
Executive Research Director of the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center

Additional Resources:
Web Resource

Spring 2017 Current Term Enrollment Estimates report

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