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Clearinghouse Staff to Discuss Transfer and Reverse Transfer Success at SHEEO Higher Ed Policy Conference, Aug. 9

by | Aug 3, 2017 | Transcript & Data Exchange Services |

Michelle Blackwell, Clearinghouse National Manager for Reverse Transfer Initiatives

The State Higher Education Executive Officers (SHEEO) will host its 2017 Higher Education Policy Conference on August 8-11 in Minneapolis. As a national organization advocating for state policy leadership, SHEEO seeks to advance public policies and educational practices to achieve more widespread access to and completion of postsecondary education.

This year’s conference will explore numerous issues, including transfer, reverse transfer, and mobility, that states must address to meet state and national attainment goals. Reverse transfer allows students to receive an associate degree that accurately reflects their educational attainment and allows them to compete more successfully in higher education and the workforce.

Clearinghouse staff will present the “Transfer & Reverse Transfer: Data, Policy, National Trends & Technology Impacts on Students Success” session on Wednesday, August 9 from 3:30-4:15 pm in the Pine/Cedar/Birch/Maple Lake rooms. This valuable session will feature the latest research and policy developments regarding transfer students and reverse transfer, based on research from the Clearinghouse, and Credit When It’s Due (CWID) researchers.

Leading the discussion will be Michelle Blackwell, Clearinghouse National Manager for Reverse Transfer Initiatives; Doug Shapiro, Executive Research Director of the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center; and Jason Taylor, Assistant Professor of Higher Education in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy at the University of Utah. Attendees will learn about national transfer and mobility patterns and research; state and national approaches to implementing reverse transfer, including the Clearinghouse’s automated process; and the impacts of reverse transfer.

“Evidence from the CWID initiative shows that the retention and bachelor’s degree completion rates for students who received an associate’s degree via reverse transfer were 5 to 18 percent higher than similar students who did not receive an associate’s degree,” said Taylor. “This evidence is promising and suggests that reverse transfer can help students make progress toward their bachelor’s degree.”

To learn more, visit the Clearinghouse’s Reverse Transfer’s webpage or contact Michelle Blackwell at mblackwell@studentClearinghouse.org.

“Clearinghouse staff will present the “Transfer & Reverse Transfer: Data, Policy, National Trends & Technology Impacts on Students Success” session on Wednesday, August 9 from 3:30-4:15 pm in the Pine/Cedar/Birch/Maple Lake rooms.”